Improving iPhone Battery Life

First thing to do is make sure there are no iOS updates awaiting installation.

If there are, run those.

Make sure you have more than 35% battery (Preferable to plug your phone into charger).

Tap Settings > General > Software Update.

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Tap Download and Install. If a message asks to temporarily remove apps because iOS needs more space for the update, tap Continue or Cancel. Later, iOS will reinstall apps that it removed.

Next:..

Go to Settings > General > Background App Refresh and take a look at the list. Do you really need all those apps updating themselves in the background and draining your battery life? Be ruthless and turn off all the apps you don’t need to update automatically. Remember, they’ll still update and work as normal when you fire them up, they just won’t keep running when you’re not using them. If you find that you don’t like the change, you can always head back into this section and toggle the apps back on again.

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Some apps will send you notifications that you don’t really need. Go to Settings > Notification Center and look under Include. Tap on any apps that you don’t need notifications from and choose None under the Alert Style, and then toggle Show in Navigation Center to off and Show on Lock Screen to off.

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You can have your iPhone update Music, Apps, and iOS automatically, but it will eat a lot of battery life. Your iPhone might also choose an inopportune moment to update everything. You can save power and battery life by going into Settings > iTunes & App Store and sliding Use Cellular Data to off, so it only updates on Wi-Fi. You’ll save even more if you just turn the automatic downloads off altogether and update on your own schedule.

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You don’t need AirDrop turned on all the time either, so swipe up from the bottom of the screen to bring up the Control Center and turn it off until you actually need it.

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Get along without iPad/iPhone Home Button

Home Button not Working on iPhone or iPad?

Here’s how to get along without it.

Extensive usage or actual damage can cause the home button can become unresponsive.

Using your iPod touch, iPhone or iPad without the Home Button CAN still be done via the touch screen.

You may have to restart you device and login freshly to get basic ‘home/start page’

Here’s how:

1. Open Settings.

2. Go to General > Accessibility

3. Scroll down to the section labeled INTERACTION and tap on AssistiveTouch.

4. On the next screen, toggle AssistiveTouch to the green On position.

5. A white circle with a grey box will appear on screen. Tap this circle to expand it to a big box on screen. The square Home button at the bottom of the box functions exactly like the physical home button – you can use it to single tap, double tap, or long press the home button even if there is a hardware problem. The grey box remains visible and usable in all apps.

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This will put a little ‘Circle’ clip_image004 on your screen that when tapped will bring up this menu:

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You will now have a ‘home button’ you can use.

Fix Microsoft Outlook – Exchange Is Unavailable, Outlook Must Be Online Or Connected

While setting up a few new users I was getting an error while trying to add a new email account.
While walking through the default setup – simply launching Outlook on a new users profile (who, of course, has and email account associated with his AD account) Outlook gave an error message that said, "The connection to Microsoft Exchange is unavailable. Outlook must be online or connected to complete this action."

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Now, I know that I’m online on the domain – the new user authenticated. AND I could ping the Exchange server via name too. Also since there are other users on this device and it’s fairly new I was pretty sure that it’s not a system error.

It finally seemed that the user (PC) was not able to see our domain controller as the global catalog server and hence was not able to find our mail server via Active Directory. [Why this was happening on only this user will have to be further investigated Smile ]

Per MS – This behavior occurs when the Exchange Server computer (where the Outlook client is homed) and the global catalog server are both located in a site that is remote from the Outlook client location. (article here).

The fix:

  1. Click Start, and then click Run.
  2. In the Open box, type regedit.exe, and then click OK.
  3. Locate and then click the following key in the registry:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Exchange\Exchange Provider
    Note You may have to create the registry path.

  4. On the Edit menu, click Add Value, and then add the following registry value:

    Value name: DS Server
    Data type: REG_SZ (string)
    Value data: FQDN of the global catalog server ( ourDC.domain.local )

Restart the PC and you should be able to reopen Microsoft Outlook and run through your profile set up. If finding the global catalog server was the issue, the problem should now be resolved and the email account should now properly add properly.

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Another LastPass vulnerability

Because I have so very many usernames and passwords, I must use some sort of password database manager.
For sometime now I have been using KeePass – an open source password manager.
Though it using it ‘can’ be slightly more onerous than a completely ‘online’ password manager like LastPass, 1Password, Dashlane or the like, it provides for WAY more security by enabling you to ‘own’ the database AND a seed file. And being an IT security guy here is no way I’d put my passwords in the cloud.

KeePass is technically an offline password manager, but its database can be synced between computers with a service like Dropbox, Google Drive or the like. Of course, at that point, you’re putting your passwords back in the cloud. BUT if you have created a KeyFile and don’t place that in the cloud and use something that is not obvious. You eliminate the ability for someone to just steal your password database and start brute forcing it.

Okay so now some more bad news. LastPass, probably the most widely used online password keeper, is once again in the news for some VERY serious security flaws.

You might want to rethink your password manager solutions or go back to pen and paper.

How to Access Local and USB Hard Drives In Your Hyper-V Virtual Machine

There are dozens of scenarios where you would want to access a physical hard drive from inside your Hyper-V virtual machine ranging from accessing and importing data, dumping data from the virtual machine into the external drive, and importing or exporting disc images.

Whatever reason you have for wanting to access an existing local hard drive in your Hyper-V machine it’s, unfortunately, a bit complicated giving the drives access to the virtual machine. Unlike other virtualization solutions (VMware and VirtualBox) there is no easy way to just share resources between the host machine and the Hyper-V virtual machine.

To use a drive within a Hyper-V machine you need to take the drive, while physically attached and mounted to the host machine, offline and then reroute the offline-to-the-host disk into the virtual machine. Let’s take a look at how to do that now.

A quick note before we proceed: this trick only works with hard drives (magnetic hard drives, solid-state hard drives, and removable USB hard drives) but does not work, alas, with removable media like flash drives.

Drive Preparation and Mounting In Hyper-V

There are two primary steps to the procedure. First we need to manage the disk from within Windows on the host machine to bring it offline (but still powered and attached to the host computer) and then we need to tell Hyper-V to take control of the now-offline disk.

Preparing the Drive

The first step is to bring the disk offline. To do so open up the Disk Management application by searching for the application name or typing “diskmgmt.msc” in the search box and running the app. Within Disk Management look for the drive you wish to pass through to the virtual machine.

Although it’s probably safe to assume, since you’re playing around with Hyper-V and concerned with matters like physical-disk-pass-through, that you’re already familiar with Disk Management it would be remiss of us not to issue a standard warning: Disk Management is a powerful tool and you can do terrible things to your system by mucking about within the management system. Double check each step and make sure you’re working with the right disk(s).

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In our case we want to pass Disk 10, a USB backup HDD, through to the virtual machine so we can dump some backup files from our virtual machine onto the disk. To prepare the disk we must first locate it in the list of drives within Disk Management, right click on it, and select “Offline” from the right-click context menu as seen in the screenshot above.

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Confirm the disk is offline. If you wish to bring the disk back online, after you’re done using it within the virtual machine, simply return to this menu, right click on the disk, and select “Online” to bring the disk back online for the host operating system.

Adding the Drive to the Virtual Machine

Once the disk is offline to the host operating system it’s time to add the disk to the virtual machine within Hyper-V. Launch Hyper-V and, from your Virtual Machines list, select the machine you wish to pass the hard disk through to.

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Right click on the machine and select “Settings…”

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From within the Settings menu for that specific virtual machine, select “SCSI Controller” from the left hand navigation pane. Select “Hard Drive” and click the “Add” button.

Note: We’ve presumed you wish to pass the hard drive through to the virtualized operating system which means you already have a SCSI controller and virtual disk for the OS. If you do not yet have a SCSI controller you will need to first select “Add Hardware” at the top of the navigation pane and add a “SCSI Controller” to your virtual machine.

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Select “Physical hard disk” and then, from the drop down menu, select the disk you brought offline in the previous section of the tutorial. Don’t worry there’s no chance you’ll accidentally select a disk from the host machine that you didn’t intend to use. The only disks you can select in the physical hard disk menu are disks that are powered and attached to the host machine but in an offline state. If you didn’t put it offline it isn’t even an option.

Confirm the disk selected is the disk you want. Press the “Apply” button and then “OK”. Boot up your virtual machine.

Accessing Your Pass-through Hard Disk

In the vast majority of cases the disk should be automatically detected by the host operating system as if it was simply a physical disk attached to the real machine the virtual machine is emulating.

If the disk isn’t immediately accessible to the virtual machine operating system you may need to open up, in the case of Windows, Disk Management and bring the disk online. When using other operating systems you’ll need to perform an equivalent action to access the disk through the virtual OS.

A very important word of caution here. The OS in the virtual machine has no idea that this disk actually belongs to your host machine and it will act upon the disk however you tell it to act upon the disk. If the disk does not automatically mount in your virtual machine OS you need to use a mounting procedure (refer to documentation for the particular OS in question) to mount the disk in the non-destructive way so that it can be returned to the host operating system later on.

When you no longer need the disk in the virtual machine simply boot down the virtual machine. Do not attempt to make changes to the drive state via the host machine until you’ve turned off the virtual machine the drive is connected to.

You can outright remove the hard drive from the virtual SCSI controller in your virtual machine if you aren’t going to use it again or you can leave the entry. Any time the physical drive is disconnected from the host machine or you’ve made it online for the host operating system the drive will simply appear as unavailable to the virtual machine.

Fix Elevated applications not having access to mapped drives

Fix Elevated applications not having access to mapped drives

One of the side effects of UAC is the inability to access the mapped (over net use) network drives from the applications running in privileged mode (Run As Administrator). This means that when you run the command prompt or an application (like SpecWin) with elevated privileges, they won’t display the disk letters of the mounted network shares.

A quick way to show what this looks like. Open command prompt, as a regular user, not an administrator and run/enter:

net use

Your screen should look something like this:

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And if you change directories and looked at what’s there, it would look something like this

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If you run the command prompt ‘As Administrator’ the prompt will look something like this:

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If you try and change drives you will get something like this:

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This behavior of the system can lead to some inconveniences when trying to run apps elevated often.

Why does it happen? This peculiarity is connected with UAC mechanism for a user with the local administrator privileges. The matter is that when this user signs in, two access tokens are created: the first token provides access without the administrator privileges (the filtered access token, with which most apps are run) and the second is the administrator token with full privileges in the system (all apps approved elevated in UAC are run using it).

When connecting shared network folders, they are associated with the current session for the current process access token and are not available with another token.

There is a solution. To implement it, you have to make some changes to the registry:

Open the registry editor (regedit.exe)

Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System

Create a new parameter (DWORD type) with the name EnableLinkedConnections and the value 1

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Restart your computer

After the computer has been restarted, make sure that you have access to the network drives from the apps run with the administrator privileges.

How it works. After you enable EnableLinkedConnections parameter of the registry, LanmanWorkstation and LSA will check if there is the second access token associated to the session of the current user. If this token is found, the list of the mounted network drives will be copied from one token to another. Thus, the network drives mounted elevated will be seen in the standard mode, and vice versa.

Ref:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/3035277/mapped-drives-are-not-available-from-an-elevated-prompt-when-uac-is-configured-to-prompt-for-credentials-in-windows

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee844140(v=ws.10).aspx

https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/49e551df-8e18-45fa-b4bf-923b5a317337/windows-8-issue-with-drive-mapping-and-uac-enabled-enablelinkedconnections?forum=w81previtpro

Creating Customized Windows 10/8.1 Media (ISO, WIM, Flash Drive)

Creating Customized Windows 10/8.1 Media (ISO, WIM, Flash Drive)

In the Enterprise environment Windows Operation Systems are usually created, captured and deployed via MS SCCM, WDS or other imaging deployment technology. This allows for an Operating System to be deployed that is updated to the latest version(s) and standards of the organization along with any other software (Office suites, AV etc.) or configurations required by that organization. These system images can be ‘pushed’ out to machines, ‘pulled’ across the network via network (PXE) boot, or be placed on portable media to be installed by technicians (usually USB drives).

I also personally install a lot of Operating systems for my SMB clients, friends and family. This requires me to have install media that is as up to date (patch wise) as possible so that I do not have to spend hours, or often days, downloading security updates and patches just to install a system and get it safe.

I used to have a full server farm (including SCCM) on my home server/workstation so creating custom images (.wim) was not too much work. However, that machine physically gave up the ghost a while ago. So for personal images I decided to create a custom image on my laptop using Microsoft Hyper-V (available on Windows 8.1 and Windows 10).

Below is how I created my latest Windows 10 fully patched image. After following these steps you will have a UEFI capable ISO and the ability to produce a UEFI bootable flash drive.

So here we go…

You will need a Microsoft Windows 10 (or 8.1) installation ISO. If you don’t have your Windows 10/8.1 installation media available or someone else’s (just iso not license key needed) it is possible to find the .iso files via a good search.

[Note: you will need a valid installation key once you install your image to a machine to activate it. Or use a KMS server/volume license.]

Download and install the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit here.

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Download and install Windows 10 (1607) or Windows 8.1 ADK with these options; you can get them here.

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Next let’s enable and configure the Microsoft Hyper-V Platform on your workstation.

You can go to the Control Panel and click on Program and Features or hold the Windows key + X and select Programs and Features at the top.

Select Turn Windows features on or off.

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Select Hyper-V and click OK. When prompted, click Restart now.

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Once rebooted, open the Start Screen and type "Hyper" > Open Hyper-V Manager.

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Select your host (computer name) on the left and then click Virtual Switch Manager. (on the right)

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Select New virtual network switch on the left and External under the type to create. Click Create Virtual Switch.

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Name the switch something appropriate (I’m using "Main").

Select External Network > Select your main NIC (wireless or wired).

Check Allow management operating system to share this network adapter and click OK.

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Click Yes on the notice prompt.

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Create the Staging VM

Now that you’re prepped, within Hyper-V Manager select New > Virtual Machine and then click Next.

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Type a name for your staging VM (I’m picking stage01) then click Next.

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Select Generation 1 and then click Next.

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Enter an appropriate amount of memory (I’m entering 4096 MB), UNselect Dynamic Memory and then click Next.

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Choose the Network Connection you previously created and then click Next.

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Designate an adequate amount of storage for your VM (not less than the total GB of all applications you will be installing) and then click Next.

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Select Install an operating system from a bootable CD/DVD-ROM > Select Image File (.iso) > Find and select the Windows ISO you downloaded earlier > Click Next > Click Finish.

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Back at the Hyper-V Manager, right click stage01 and select Connect… (This will open the console of the VM.)

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Navigate to Action and click Start.

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Install Windows 10 by accepting the EULA and choosing Custom > selecting the entire virtual disk and clicking Next.

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Then let the setup continue until it reboots and you get to the first ‘customization’ screen.

Enter Audit Mode and Install Applications

Start Windows installation normally. After reboot or two Windows is installed and process stops waiting your input. At this point we need to click on the Use express settings button. On next dialog you should not type a username, so don’t enter it. – STOP.

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Instead, press and hold down the CTRL+SHIFT+F3 keys combination. Windows will now reboot to a special customization mode, the Audit Mode.

When presented with the System Preparation Tool window, click Cancel

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You’re now in Audit mode. Audit mode is used to add customizations to Windows images. When you use audit mode, the system does not have to apply settings in Windows Welcome – things like creating user accounts, read and accept the Microsoft® Software License Terms, and select their language and time zones etc. It is designed specifically for preparing Windows images for deployment.

Okay so now let’s prepare and update the system. In Windows 10 (and 8.1) you can forcefully check for updates here:

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OR you can use PowerShell to update – as in my previous article. I’d make sure ALL the updates are done – reboot several times (clicking ‘Cancel’ each time) until you’re sure that there are no more updates.

You may also want to uninstall any Windows ‘Store’ apps per this article.

Here is where you will download/install any software you wish to be on your image.

I install things like Office Suites, Acrobat, 7-zip, Java, different Browsers (Chrome Firefox etc.), plugins (Flash, Shockwave etc.) and such.

Once done with all your installs you should clean up all temp files (I use CCleaner portable) and run Disk Cleanup too.

So now let’s finalize and Sysprep the disk.

Shutdown your Staging VM.

Create a Checkpoint

Click Action > Checkpoint.. > Enter "Ready for sysprep" > Click Yes

Power your Staging VM back on.

When logged in, do not close the System Preparation Tool window this time.

Select Enable System Out-of-Box Experience (OOBE)

Checkbox Generalize

Select Shutdown

Click OK

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Now we’re going to create the WIM file that we’ll use for creating our install media. The WIM file is a compressed image which is deployed during Windows installation. The install.wim file is the actual source used when installing Windows 10. Thus, we need to create our own WIM file, and replace the stock one with it. To do this, we need to "capture" the last Checkpoint – the one named ‘Complete’.

We’ll use the DISM tool to capture a mounted hard drive.

So we first need to mount the VHD (virtual hard drive) of our very last/updated VM – the checkpoint we named complete.

Once your VM is shut down, create another Checkpoint named "Complete". 
Do NOT power your VM back on.

As mentioned above, the install.wim file is the actual source used when installing Windows 10. Thus, we need to create our own WIM file, and replace the stock one with it. To do this, we need to "capture" the last Checkpoint.

On your host (physical machine), open up Disk Management. 
WIN+X > Disk Management

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Navigate to Action > Attach VHD

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Click Browse

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Navigate to the directory where the virtual disks are stored for stage01. By default this directory is: C:\Users\Public\Documents\Hyper-V\Virtual hard disks/

In the bottom right, change Virtual Disk files (* .vhd, * .vhdx) to All files (* . *)

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Select the file with the most recent Date Modified – this is your Complete Checkpoint!

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Click Open

Check box Read-only and then click OK.

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At this point you will see one new disk with two partitions. Make note of the second partition drive letter (in my case, the F: Drive).

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Now the capture!

Open the Command Prompt with Administrator Rights.

WIN+X > Command Prompt (Admin)

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Type:

dism /capture-image /imagefile:c:\customInstall.wim /capturedir:F:\ /name:"Windows 10 Enterprise – Customized by: Darth Sidious" /Description:"Windows 10 Enterprise – Customized by: Darth Sidious" /compress:maximum /checkintegrity /verify /bootable

replacing F: with the second partition drive letter you made note of earlier – and replacing "Customized by: Darth Sidious" with whatever you want.

Depending on your processing power, this may take a little while. When complete, you will see "This operation completed successfully." You should now see a file named "customInstall.wim" at the root of your C:\ Drive.

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Build the Customized Media

Open/Double click the stock ISO you used to install Windows in stage01 to mount it within File Explorer.

Open This PC and double click the newly mounted drive.
(In my case, Drive E: SW_DVD5_WIN_ENT_10_1607_64BIT_English_MLF_X21-07102.ISO)

CTRL+A (to select all) and CTRL+C (to copy)

Create a new folder named WinExtract off your C:\ drive

(Another location is fine too, but these instructions will be assuming C:\)

Navigate to C:\WinExtract\ and CTRL+V (to paste).

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After the copy completes, navigate to C:\WinExtract\sources\ and delete the install.wim file.

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Move C:\customInstall.wim (your custom WIM) to C:\WinExtract\sources\.

Rename C:\WinExtract\sources\customInstall.wim to install.wim.

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At this point, you are ready to create your ISO.

Create UEFI Bootable ISO:

Open Admin Command Prompt

Change directory (cd) to:

C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\Assessment and Deployment Kit\Deployment Tools\amd64\Oscdimg

Then enter and run:

oscdimg -m -u2 -bC:\WinExtract\boot\etfsboot.com C:\WinExtract\ C:\Windows10Updated.iso

Once complete, you now have a UEFI bootable ISO named Windows10Updated.iso

[If you are making a Windows 8.1 image you will need to use the right directory for the ‘Windows Kits/adk selection]

You should now test your .iso by using it to create a new VM. Verify that it installs and works. Then you can create a bootable USB drive.

I use Rufus Portable to create my bootable USBs. Portable download here.

One of the first cool things about Rufus Portable is that no installation is necessary to run it. When you run it, setting it up is simple. Select the USB drive you want to use. To make sure your drive will boot on most devices including newer UEFI ones select the ‘MBR partition scheme for BIOS or UEFI Computers’ and also ‘Use Rufus MBR’ option.

Then select the disc icon next to the ISO drop-down and navigate to the location of your newly created Windows 10 ISO.

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After that click Start and you should be good to go, within minutes.

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Hope this helps some. I put this up here, like most of my stuff, mainly so I have a place to remember what I did. 😛

Happy image building.

WebEx in Chrome security flaw

Recently there have been some pretty big security issues found with several browser plug-ins. Like this huge one for the WebEx in Chrome issue

It is best that, if you must use them, you manually update them. Please always keep your stuff updated.

To force update Chrome extensions:

Open Chrome, then got to Settings – clicking on the three vertical dots in the top right of Chrome.

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Then click on Extensions:

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Next Click on ‘Developer mode’ then click on “Update extensions now”

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For Firefox you need to update addons and plug-ins:

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Then

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And then

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Watch out for e-Mail Scams about Electronic Tax Payments

Well it’s getting closer to tax season.

Many of us do our taxes as soon as we get our year end statements and many of us have quarterly taxes we pay.

Either way please keep an eye our for scams ‘reminding you of payments’ telling you owe payments and the like.

Believe me – if the IRS or the State wants their tax dollars they’ll reach out to you via REGULAR MAIL they will NOT be using some third party payment processing company.

The idea with emails like the one I just received is to first scare you into thinking you owe money, and second get you to click on a malicious link – one that will either infect your system or get you to a site designed to one way or another separate you from your money. Often times with life operators asking questions and continuing the scare tactics.

SCAM

Above is one I just received. – IT’S COMPLETELY B.S.!!

Please IF you are ever concerned about a Tax problem go to the ‘front door’ of the agency – www.irs.gov, www.oregon.gov/dor, or the like, via your web browser address bar (NOT a search bar – the very top bar of your browser that says, http://www……)

the IRS has some good info here.

Remember be safe folks

Let’s get backing up this New Year!

So another year is gone and a new one is upon us.
Many of us have received or purchased new computer systems for personal use, work or school or will be soon.
Nowadays many of us have a great deal of our lives – pictures of family, personal and legal documents and more stored digitally on our computers. And many do not have any backups of said systems.

I continually preach the benefits of using system images for backing up your computers. With imaging you can restore entire systems in case of hard disk failure, restore individual files and folders, upgrade/migrate to newer larger and faster HDDs (usually SSDs) and even move to completely new systems.

One of the first things everyone should know is that your digital system(s) WILL fail. And can at anytime. And if you have no recoverable backup your data will be gone forever. Please don’t let this happen to you.
One thing I do – because I am such a stickler on having my own stuff backed up, is have TWO full backups on SEPARATE disk drives. This allows for me to keep the two seperate full images in two different locations. And should one backup drive fail, I have another to go to. The likely hood that both would fail (along with my primary system) is remote and if I had that triple whammy I’d have to assume God needed me to lose it all.

External Hard Disk Drives can be had very inexpensively. For example here is a good deal on one from Amazon. And the cost of imaging software is under $100.00 US (often way less too). A VERY small price to pay for peace of mind and the security of knowing you’ll be able to recover your important files, pictures and entire system.

Here is a previous article I’ve written. All points valid still.

Here are the tools I regularly use:

Acronis – Acronis works on Mac and PC. I prefer the 1-time purchase option because I like to OWN my stuff and not ‘rent’ it. Check that out here. They have loads of tutorials in their knowledge base.

For Mac only there is Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC), my favorite. Or another good alternative SuperDuper.

Of course on Macs, you can use Apples built in Disk Utility to create an image but it is more onerous. And you can’t really make incremental backups. You can of course, create an image and use TimeMachine backups to make up the difference I guess.

As a free alternative for Windows 8.1 and 10 there is the built in backup utility which includes and imaging option. However I’ve had issues restoring images to differing hardware. Here is a very good article on how to do that.

Another very good option for PC is Macrium Reflect. They even have a free version (here) that works very well. I’ve used the latest version successfully a few times.

One more way I use to augment my backups is with the "Cloud".
Cloud storage sounds very nebulous, but is really just utilizing large storage pools made available by numerous internet service providers to augment their offerings and services.
Cloud storage is GREAT for storing a large amount of ‘nonproprietary’ information; things like most pictures many documents and files etc. I just make sure to not put up to the cloud any critical/personal/financial documents or other highly private information.
I pay a little extra to Google to have loads of extra Google drive space that I upload many pics and files to. [and of course Google provides for free unlimited photo storage with some gotchas on the having to do with photo size and quality].
I have Microsoft’s One Drive that came with my purchases of Microsoft Office and some Windows 10 devices; but that storage size has been cut down recently.
With my Amazon Prime account I also have unlimited picture storage too. 
And I also even have Dropbox.

So for plain mundane data storage you can see I use many of the available options in the cloud. But the ‘cloud’ does NOT enable you to recover your entire system should the drive or other major component fail. Or worse – burn up in a fire or get damaged by some other catastrophe.
So no matter what I store in the cloud I ALWAYS have copies on my own personal systems somewhere.

I may be a more than a little "tight" about keeping data. But decades of dealing with data losses in the corporate and personal world has made me so.

I hope that some of you take some time in this New Year to do some digital safe guarding. Like a fire extinguisher you need to have it on hand and ready before you have the fire.